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THE LAB OPENING UP ON NUTRITION

The Ultimate Bulking Diet Guide For Skinny Guys

A Hands-On Primer to Getting Your Nutrition Together, Finally Understanding What It All Means And Rapidly Growing Muscle As A Skinny Dude (without spending all day in the kitchen)

BY DEAN PHILLIPS - 53 MIN READ
Learn the basics you need to know to get a bulking diet plan together - without all the common mistakes skinny dudes usually make.
If you're a skinny guy that's looked at nutrition before, then you've probably been told you just have to eat more, have six meals a day and down a bunch of protein shakes, right?

With “experts” saying different things every week and studies being splashed on front of the newspapers claiming something “new” and “revolutionary”, it might feel like you're just never getting it right ...

The truth is:

There's a set of nutrition principles that any skinny guy can follow to get results ...

And that’s exactly why I wrote this guide and am giving it away for free.

It's a set of proven principles that have helped guys who struggle to gain weight, actually build a load of muscle, but can also make nutrition way (WAY) simpler, meaning you’re more likely to follow through and get results.
Dean Phillips - Hover to see my before picture
Hey! I'm Your Coach But...

Who Am I Anyway?

Hi, I’m Dean Phillips.

Former skinny guy and the owner of The Superhuman Lab. I’ve helped thousands of men build more muscle, gain more confidence and become superhuman. I’ve also gained more than 60 pounds myself (going from 112 pounds to more than 172 pounds).

Why I Created This Guide

For years, I struggled with being 112 pounds: I had a sunken chest, Cheerio-like wrists and narrow shoulders.
Clothes didn’t fit properly (even the extra small ones) and the clothes I could wear served only to try and make me look bigger – the classic long-sleeve-top-with-a-t-shirt-underneath-it look.

It was one of the most crippling experiences of my life, and it affected everything I did (without me even realising it).

I ate everything I could get my hands on. I read workout programs online. I even hired a personal trainer.

But I constantly struggled to gain any meaningful size to my skinny frame.

The truth is, my diet was a mess (from a muscle building standpoint) and I was totally obsessed with living the fitness lifestyle ...

⁠Your nutrition (or “diet” plan) makes up a large majority of your success.

Clothes didn’t fit properly (even the extra small ones) and the clothes I could wear served only to try and make me look bigger – the classic long-sleeve-top-with-a-t-shirt-underneath-it look.

It was one of the most crippling experiences of my life, and it affected everything I did (without me even realising it).

I ate everything I could get my hands on. I read workout programs online. I even hired a personal trainer.

But I constantly struggled to gain any meaningful size to my skinny frame.

The truth is, my diet was a mess (from a muscle building standpoint) and I was totally obsessed with living the fitness lifestyle ...

What is this guide + how will it help you?

Here's what you should expect from this free guide and how it can help you as a skinny dude
We'll take you through each step of a bulking diet. From the common mistakes to macros to fitting in around your life.
Forget diet hacks and focus on the foundation of a solid muscle building diet plan (no matter what trends are currently out there).
We'll give you examples, science backed information and even some emojis for good measure
Don’t have time to read the whole guide right now?
No worries. Let me send you a copy of the full 72-page ebook so you can read it when it’s convenient for you. Just let me know where to send it (takes 5 seconds)
_01 CHAPTER

The Top 4 Nutrition Myths That Skinny Guys Fall For (Time And Time Again)

If you've been around the fitness industry for any amount of time, read a fitness magazine or seen the front page of most newspapers, then at some point in time you've most likely been exposed to some myths.
In this chapter, you’re going to learn a few of the biggest mistakes, and myths skinny guys fall for.

Then in the following chapters, you’ll get a solid plan for cutting through the BS and turning these around, so by the end of this guide you’ll know what exactly works and what doesn't.

Sound good?

Myth 01: It's all about calories

When it comes to building muscle, we're often told that we need to eat enough calories in order to grow, and although this is true, it's often pushed to extremes ...

Skinny guys eating whatever they can in order to build muscle and often following the "see food" diet, where they consume whatever they can.

Why?

Because we're often told that the more you eat, the bigger you’ll get and that “A calorie is a calorie.”

Meaning 1 calorie = 1 calorie - consume enough and you'll gain enough muscle.

The 3 stages of calories:

• Calorie Surplus
• Calorie Deficit
• Calorie Maintenance

However, if that were true, then all the burgers and ice creams you’ve been having would mean you’d be huge by now if you had the right.

The reality is that different foods break down differently ...

So different foods have different effects on hunger, hormones and health.

It's because of this that we find it important to look at these three areas when it comes to getting in your calories to not only build muscle, but to also feel great in the process as well…

The 4 Rules of Calories For Skinny Dudes:

01
Stay in a calorie surplus: You need to eat more than you're burning.
02
These Calories Need To Come From Certain Macros: Build your calories around certain macro frameworks and food sources.
03
Consume foods that are less filling (Don't worry, we'll cover this more later on.)
04
Feel good in the process: Consume foods that you feel good eating. (This is one most guys forget about.)
Eating any food to boost calories is a bad idea for any skinny guy wanting a lean, muscular, superhero physique – not to mention how shitty you'd feel doing it.

And when you take these 4 rules into account (plus what you’ll learn in the upcoming chapters), you'll be surprised at not only how much easier it becomes to build muscle, but how much better it'll feel to have less bloat and more enjoyable meals.

Remember to follow them and question if you’re feeling great (heck, even fantastic!) in the process.

Myth 2: It's all about calories

Eating any food to boost calories is a bad idea for any skinny guy wanting a lean, muscular, superhero physique – not to mention how shitty you'd feel doing it.

And when you take these 4 rules into account (plus what you’ll learn in the upcoming chapters), you'll be surprised at not only how much easier it becomes to build muscle, but how much better it'll feel to have less bloat and more enjoyable meals.

Remember to follow them and question if you’re feeling great (heck, even fantastic!) in the process.

It's because of this, we recommend using a certain approach when starting out:

01
We use the hand-portion approach to guide our meals when creating our macro/calorie framework – this allows beginners to gauge portion sizes easily.
02
Then we measure these amounts of foods for 1-3 days (depending on how much you change your meals up) to see what the calories and macros roughly come to.
03
Take that information and adjust the sizes up or down, and use step 1 going forward –no longer needing to measure and whip out the scales.
If you're someone who likes to micromanage everything, then this approach might feel difficult a first, but as time goes on you'll be happy that you'll be able to make adjustments much easier and your results will still be as great as if you were counting everything.

Something to note:

As a skinny dude, I recommend you going on the bigger side when it comes to your portion sizes. It's always better to hit them calories, than miss them out and not grow.

Although, even though you'll wanna go on the bigger side of most things, you'll be glad to know it might be the case for protein ...

Myth 3: Focusing Your Diet Mostly Around Protein

Look in any fitness magazines or talk to any trainer and you’ll typically hear a common trend:

“Protein, Protein, Protein! Make sure you get in as much as you can ..." - Every fitness magazine, ever

And yes, there’s some truth to this.

After all, if you don’t eat enough protein, your body won’t build muscle – it’s a fact!

Getting adequate amounts of protein is a common problem for most beginners, vegetarians and vegans. They eat too little protein and as a result, they end up struggling to put on muscle (or even preserve muscle mass when trying to diet down).

Because of this, you'd think that the more protein we eat, the more muscle we’ll get, right?!

However, research has proven otherwise!

It's been shown that as a skinny guy, eating a diet super high in protein blunts your body’s ability to grow muscle.

Sounds different to what we've heard before, right?

Let me explain …

Most studies around protein usage are flawed. They’re often funded by supplement companies who pay their bills by selling protein powders. Therefore, these companies have a huge vested interest in proving that more protein = more muscle.

So why does that all matter?

Well "actual studies" seems that eating stupid amounts of protein doesn’t mean you’ll get bigger.
It seems like once the minimum required amount of protein is met, eating more protein on top of that has very little effect beyond the extra calories that you get from it.
SHANE DUQUETTE
BONY TO BEASTLY
So while we do need to eat enough protein in order to build muscle, we don’t need the numbers we've often been told (typically 1.5 - 2g protein per pound bodyweight) when trying to put on muscle.

And I'm not the only one to see this ...
Consuming 5.5 times the recommended daily allowance of protein has no effect on body composition in resistance-trained individuals who otherwise maintain the same training regimen
JOSE ANTONIO
DIRECTOR IN CHIEF OF ISSN
02 CHAPTER

Macronutrients: The 3 Kinds of Food Groups You Need

If you've read anything on food before, then you might have stumbled across the term “macros” or heard things like “If it fits your macros”, “track those macros”, “your macros may be off”.
So you might be wondering what the heck does it all mean?

Macros, or their full name "Macronutrients" are the energy-giving parts of food that fuels our body – collectively they make up your calories and they're made up of 3 food groups ...

These 3 food groups are protein, carbs and fats

If you’ve wondered what these are, and how to use each one in the best way for more energy, less fat and to make sure you get as much muscle as possible, then this chapter has you covered.

For each of these you'll also get a brief summary of what each one does and an example of some foods that you'll find these macros in.

Let's dive into the one you've most likely already heard a lot about ...

Macro 1

Protein: The Building Blocks

The fitness industry absolutely loves this, and in recent times, every food that has a slight speckle of protein in it has a "protein" label on it ...

In fact, cereals, nuts, heck even chocolate bars are being passed off as high protein snacks (hint: they're really not).

Why has protein became so popular?

Just like Spiderman, protein has some big responsibilities – from brain function and muscle repair to better skin and nails, amongst a whole load more of beneficial things.

But the main reason it's popular right now is its importance on building muscle, and for the peeps that need to help with weight management it has the (not so great for skinny dudes) benefit of keeping people fuller for longer.

How is protein created?

Protein is built from individual amino acids (which make up muscle), so when you eat a steak or chicken breast, in reality you’re eating muscle.
For The Geeks Amongst Us
Your body breaks down that muscle into smaller protein chains and finally down into individual amino acids. Those amino acids then travel to your muscles where they regroup to build them up.

This is commonly why you hear that amino acids are building blocks for the body. I wouldn't make a house out of them though!
If you're a skinny guy that is (hopefully) lifting weights multiple times a week, then protein is a must have.

But not as badly as we're told ...

Science shows that extremely high protein diets are one way to crush something other than your bank account – your muscle building potential!

That’s because as long as you get the minimum required amount of protein for building muscle, eating more protein on top of that has been shown to only have a tiny effect on muscle growth (besides the extra calories that you get from it — which isn’t much by the way).

As a skinny dude, it's much more important to focus on getting in carbohydrates. (Don’t worry, we’ll cover that next.)

More carbs and more calories mean we’re about to build more muscle out of less protein (something the magazines, books and boring workshops done by the local goo-roos never tell us).

So how much protein is needed to build muscle as a skinny guy?

You'll be pleased to know you can leave behind the 2-3g/pound of bodyweight amount (typically told by protein customers).

The real amount for a skinny guy is going to shock you ...

Some research has shown that anything over 0.8 grams has no particular effect on muscle growth (apart from the extra calories), but I’ve seen results that point towards a higher range, and an amount that really maximises results (mainly from working with clients and self-experimentation).

The best place to get protein is from high protein foods such as chicken, turkey, beef, pork and eggs.

Plant-based foods with protein in them, such as nuts, beans and quinoa, are low-efficiency protein sources. This means you’d need to eat a much higher quantity of these foods to get your optimal protein amount (and you'd get a bunch of macros you might not want).

These are healthy foods that are great for you, but I wouldn't recommend them as your primary protein sources.

This is why you rarely see vegan bodybuilders unless they’re extreme genetic muscle-freaks of nature. That isn’t to say you can’t do it – you can still attain a muscular physique as a vegan, but the road will be much longer and much more challenging.

For the omnivores (and vegetarians out there), here’s a list of high-quality protein sources that are ideal for packing on muscle:
How much protein you want to aim for
To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.
Recommended Protein Sources
To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.

To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.

Macro 2

Carbohydrates

One trend we see often with people who have poor diets is this:

They eat far too many refined carbohydrates.

And it makes sense – they're everywhere, they're pretty cheap and convenient. But, of course, they’re crappy for us too.

Most guys who do care about nutrition (who attempt to avoid typical junk food, etc.) mainly stick to vitamin-rich vegetables that are low in calories, because most calorie-dense carbs have hardly any nutrients in them (pasta, white bread, white rice, muffins, etc.). This causes people to run out of options (or so they think).

But as you're a skinny guy, not only do you have the benefits of being able to reach for nutritionally dense, low toxic foods, but you also get to bring in a wide range of other carb sources too.

Pretty cool, right?

All carbs convert into glucose, which can normally lead to fat gain and it's because of this belief that we've resulted in protein being thought of as the king it is today.

However, after working with great teams at places, such as Scrawny to Brawny, Precision Nutrition and other great companies, I stand with a different viewpoint – a balanced and structured one.

It’s important that carbohydrates make up approximately 20% to 50% of your overall diet, depending on what you’re trying to accomplish and your activity levels.

Carbs can normally be broken down into 2 groups: (Fast) Simple & (Slow) Complex carbs.

Both have different structures and different purposes in the body, and your overall goals.

Simple carbs = Fast

Complex carbs = Slow

Carbs are considered to be anabolic because they elevate your insulin levels. This means that they put your body in a muscle-building state.

The faster the carb, the bigger the chance of an insulin spike + tiredness + fat gain, but that's not to say faster carbs don't have their purpose when used correctly.

We'll discuss the benefits of that later, but for now just know that this can result in sugar highs, followed by lethargy-filled sugar crashes (say around lunchtime when a nap sounds like pure bliss).

In the short term (for the average joe) this would make you fat. This could eventually lead to health problems such as diabetes and increased cholesterol levels.

Have too few carbohydrates and your body will start converting the protein that you’re eating into glucose. Since protein is expensive, as well as vital for putting on muscle, we don’t want any of it going to waste.

Too few carbohydrates can also drastically limit your body’s ability to pack on muscle. Your body, after all, needs glucose—it’s our primary source of energy.

When we’re lifting hundreds of pounds in the gym, our body is fuelled by glucose (stored in our muscles and liver as glycogen), and we need a tonne of it. Try going to the gym on an empty stomach and see how long you last.

So, as skinny guys looking to take on the gym and pack on muscle, we fall into the 40+% carbohydrate category.

If you’re really emaciated, you might even want to be getting 50-60% of your calories from carbohydrates.

If you follow the Handsome Carb Cycling Approach, you’ll be getting the best of both worlds and will have a physique to be proud of in no time.

Feed your body carbohydrates every single time it needs them to get maximum muscle gains. Avoid them when they’re unnecessary, and thus avoid putting on fat.

In short:

Be aware! Processed sugar contains no micronutrients. Yet it’s often the main ingredient in most questionable foods (such as orange juice, believe it or not!).

And opt for slower digesting carbs for the majority of your meals – these are richer in nutrients, and will leave you with more energy throughout the day.
How many carbs you want to aim for
It’s important that carbohydrates make up approximately 20% to 50% of your overall diet, depending on what you’re trying to accomplish and your activity levels.
Recommended Carb Sources
To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.

To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.
How Much You Need
To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.

Macro 3

Fats

I'd have to say that fat seems to have caused the most controversy when it comes to all of the macros.

We've became a society that's scared that fat is the leading cause for us being fat (especially with ‘What the Health’ vegan propaganda being thrown at the mainstream).

However, having a high fat diet has been (surprisingly) shown to improve blood count, brain function and testosterone production.

If you’re a skinny guy (and a guy in general), then balancing your hormones is something that needs to come high on your list of priorities.

Is all fat the same and why are we as a nation scared of the stuff?

Saturated Fats

Yep, that’s right, saturated fats kick ass. They are essential for maintaining testosterone levels, which we all know is a major hormone that is connected to muscle growth.

Omega 3 and Polyunsaturated Fats

These fats help to decrease the level of bad cholesterol and, therefore, lower the risk of developing heart disease. Omega 3 fats are essential fats, meaning they cannot be made by the body so we have to get them from food or supplements.

Fish oil, in a nutshell, is one of the healthy fats that aids in keeping body fat off, as well as preserving cardiovascular health and preventing diabetes.

Omega 3 is also known to have brain-boosting benefits and is proven to help increase muscle growth by lowering the stress hormone cortisol. The list goes on and on, so just remember, Omega 3 is a must have.

These can be found in salmon, mackerel, herring, nuts, sunflower seeds and, obviously, in fish oil supplements.

Monounsaturated fats

These are critical to feeling great, as they aid joint recovery, which is essential when training with weights. The last thing we want when training and in life is weak joints and low testosterone levels.

Fatty fish, such as salmon and trout, nuts, olive oil, avocados and peanut butter, as well as egg yolks and beef, are excellent sources.

So there you have it, that's all the 3 food groups and what they do.

Now, let's move on to how to time these with your meals.
Recommended Carb Sources
To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.

To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.
How Much You Need
To gain quality mass, you'll need 0.8-1g protein per pound of bodyweight. For example: At 175 lbs, you'd take in 140-175 grams of protein per day.
03 CHAPTER

How To Fit Meals Around Your Life, No Matter How Busy You Are

When you're a busy dude, the last thing you want is to be a slave to the kitchen and (even worse) to your diet.
Food shouldn’t be your enemy; it should be your rocket fuel for life – helping you build muscle and give you more energy to support your bachelor lifestyle.

Have you tried to cram as much down your throat as possible, but still struggled to gain muscle?

Have you struggled to fit your diet plan around family life, work life or college?

I sure did, and I completely bombed my chance of being a jacked and muscular dude.

And I'm not alone, I often get emails like this:
In chapter 1 on myths, we spoke about the meal timing myth. In this chapter, we're going to answer how often you need to eat (aka the truth)

And it's not as complex or as sexy as the fitness industry generally likes us to believe (sorry)

How Many Meals Do I Need To Eat & How Often?

When I was 112 pounds, I was told I needed to have a minimum of 7 meals a day to reach my goal.

So what did I do?

I ate and ate until I was a skinny fat, bloated, uncomfortable mess.
  • Meal 1) Porridge in semi skimmed milk
  • Meal 2) Quinoa + Pork
  • Meal 3) Whole Grain pasta, chicken in a pasta sauce
  • Meal 4) (Store Bought) Weight Gainer Shake
  • Meal 5) Wholegrain rice + Chilli
  • Meal 6) Post Workout Shake
  • Meal 7) Cottage Cheese + Peanut Butter
Yes, I grew some muscle – how couldn't I?

But I also grew a fair bit of fat in the process and made an even bigger mistake ...

My entire day was built around my food cycle.

I’d hit the meals like clockwork, and if I was going to miss one?

Then I’d run back home to make sure I didn’t.* 1

I'm not a big fan of this at all and science has our back too (yay for science)

Feel free to skip this next section if you're not into the science ...

A Look Into The Science of Meal Timing:

Over a decade ago, the idea of nutrient timing became the “Next Big Thing”. It was written about everywhere and science was loud in saying how great it was ...
Since the early 2000s, for example, we’ve discovered that some of those early studies had design flaws or weaknesses.

First, they were mostly short-term — spanning a few weeks or months, maybe even just a few workout sessions. Because of this, they didn’t really tell us what would happen over a longer time span.

Second, they considered what we call “soft” end-points, such as protein synthesis, glycogen replenishment or nitrogen balance. Because of this, we didn’t have data on “hard” endpoints such as actual fat loss or lean mass gain.
BRIAN ST. PIERRE
PRECISION NUTRITION
However, since then, we've had a bunch more science help us understand things in more detail and on a longer time frame.

Here's just a few of them ...

1) Muscle catabolism (muscles physically getting smaller) won’t happen until a few days after your last meal.

This means that if you’re still training, you won’t lose any muscle mass if you reduce the frequency in which you eat.

So having bigger gaps in between meals and taking in fewer meals in total (more on this soon) won’t cause you to become skinnier or lose muscle mass.

2) A healthy body (with a healthy diet) is pretty damn good at being able to regulate proper blood sugar levels (meaning you won’t suddenly pass out).

You can go 48 hours without food before any noticeable difference in blood sugar levels takes place in the body. (Crazy, as I know so many people who moan about this far too often.)

The same study that looked at this also said that insulin sensitivity is better with three daily meals than it is with fourteen.

Who knew?!

3) Starvation Mode Isn’t Really As Big of A Thing As You Might Think. (Seriously.)

I fell for this when I first started.

When you hear it explained by most people, it seems to make so much sense, right?!

But what you might not realise is that it takes the body several hours to digest a large meal (as is the case with The SBS Approach), meaning your body won’t even notice that it’s not getting fed every couple of hours.

"Some hormones in our body will induce a “starvation mode” effect and result in increased fat storage, like reduced leptin production, but that has nothing to do with meal frequency.

This, however, is more to do with restricting carbohydrates and calories over an extended period of time. (7 days on a restricted diet would result in a 50% drop in leptin secretions such as when on a keto diet.)” - Shane D, from B2B


Thankfully, however, as a skinny dude trying to build muscle, you will never need to worry about that ?

4) Eating in general increases your metabolism

Eating often has a positive effect on your metabolism as a whole, due to the thermic effect of food (TEF).

But that doesn’t mean it’s the best thing to do.

“The magnitude and duration of that boost depends on how much you eat. A small meal causes a small metabolic spike that doesn’t last very long, whereas a large meal produces a larger spike that lasts longer.“ Mike Matthew | Muscle For Life

Therefore, as long as the type of food and its timing are consistent, then so is the net metabolic response.

So really, there’s no downside to your metabolism ...

My #2 Favourite Meal Timing Frameworks

There are only two methods that I like when it comes to making good nutrition a part of your life.

The following two frameworks are my two favourites, and they’re the ones I find myself going to all the time.

They’re just as effective as one another – it all comes down to personal preference.

The main thing to getting your plan right is this:
Planning is key. Make life as easy as possible so your brain can do more important things
Nate Green
BIGGER SMALLER BIGGER
Whatever plan you decide to choose, make sure it’s consistent, and written down with some structure.

This might not sound pretty “revolutionary”, but it doesn’t mean it doesn’t work – both work and are pretty simple to follow.

FRAMEWORK 1

Bigger Smaller Bigger

The BSB Approach is something I learned from Nate Green, from an experiment he did on himself back in 2012.

The BSB Approach

01
Two Solid Meals (typically breakfast + dinner)
02
Pre/During/Post-Workout Supplementation in the form of liquid nutrition (which is super helpful for getting in extra calories)
03
A full day of fasting on a Sunday (meaning zero food for the entire day) - which equals around 30+ hours
Now, I love this approach for many reasons:

It's convenient for some guys that can't have many meals, and it's extremely effective for building muscle. Also, it's a bit more familiar than consuming a lot of small meals.

But there are a few drawbacks:

• It requires a pretty big appetite, and if you're a truly skinny guy with a poor appetite, then it might be extremely difficult to fit your overall calorie surplus into such small windows/meal frequencies.

• The other thing I wouldn't do when starting out, as I mentioned before, is the full day of IF. (Nate was a pretty big, healthy, handsome dude before doing this, so he could afford it a lot more in my opinion – plus his body really needed the break from the amount of food he was throwing down his throat.)
Of course, I knew before I started this experiment the food would be a challenge. But I only thought about the amount of food and fitting it all in my stomach. I never considered how long it’d take me actually to eat it.
Nate Green
BIGGER SMALLER BIGGER
Obviously, you don’t have to go as extreme, but do note that you’ll need to hit and work your day’s worth of macros, and calories into this approach.

FRAMEWORK 2

The 3/2 Framework

Now let me get something straight:

Both approaches have three things in common:

They use solid meals.

They use supplementation (lightly).

They work, and both will take some time to get used to.

If you’re like most people, then you most likely already have three solid meals a day.

Right? Right!

Most of us, in modern life, have breakfast, lunch and dinner.

We’re used to it, and it’s a habit not to fuck with.

The 3/2 approach takes the three solid meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) and adds two strongman shakes (a homemade drink we recommend in our program).

The 3/2 Framework

01
Breakfast
Coffee (black or a tablespoon of cream)
Bacon, eggs, green veg, greens drink, fish oil + nuts
Porridge (in almond milk) – optional (depending on how tired you feel afterwards)
02
Lunch
Chicken, Mexican rice, salad with olive oil, nuts
03
Dinner
Mashed potatoes + Beef + Gravy + onions, peppers, salsa fish oil (on the side + multivitamin)
These are just examples, and obviously, the meal size is dependent on you (and how many calories you need as a skinny guy).

So make a decision – is it going to be few meals, like The BSB Approach, or 5-6 like The 3/2 Framework?!

Both work and it all just depends on if you work from home, have more time to eat, absolutely adore food, etc.

Pick one strategy to try for yourself and stick with it for 7 days.
04 CHAPTER

Basic Supplements & What To Take Around Your Workouts

If you're here, then there's a good chance you're working out. And let's face it, your workouts are important.
So why do most simply waste them by slamming whatever they can down their throats?

Let’s fix that.

Now before we go ahead, let's do a little recap:

If you’ve read up to this point, then you know what macros are, how they work and the best sources for them.

You also know the mistakes I see skinny dudes making all the time, and in the last chapter, we looked at how often you should eat if you want to build muscle whilst having a life. (I even shared my two favourite frameworks to fit your meal plans around your life.)

Now let's talk about the nutrients that fall around your workouts ...

In chapter 1 on myths, we spoke about the meal timing myth. In this chapter, we're going to answer how often you need to eat (aka the truth)

And it's not as complex or as sexy as the fitness industry generally likes us to believe (sorry)

What To Take Before, During and After a Workout

When was the last time you spoke to someone about building muscle, and they just told you to “drink a protein shake and have carbs before you train”?

That’s cool, and it has some purpose (as we’ll get to in a second).

Workout nutrition is pretty great when used correctly – it can accelerate muscle growth through the roof

This chapter is divided into 2 sections:
Before workout
What you should eat around 1 hour before you lift weights
After Workout
What you should take after a workout (be that late at night, or straight after)
Each of these when taken together will help you with the energy and strength to head into a workout with the strongest chance of lifting weights that'll cause growth.

You'll be hydrated and be able to contract muscles correctly, and you'll recover your damaged muscles and fuel your body with the calories it needs to grow (without the chance of gaining fat in the process).

BEFORE YOUR WORKOUT

How To Set Yourself Up To Workout

Most people out there slam carbohydrates (like Powerade) and energy drinks, as they’ve come to believe that they improve workouts. The reality, however, is they make you crash, feel shitty and generally do nothing but burn a hole in your pocket.

However, there are more customised and detailed ways. For this guide, I want to offer you two options to choose from.

1. To eat like normal:

This would include a handful of veggies, some protein, moderate carbs and a little bit of fats.

2. A liquid meal to fuel the workout:

This would be similar to the above, but I’d minimise the fat a lot more.

This will give you ample amounts of energy, and amino acids to fuel your workout.

After YOUR WORKOUT

How To Lower Your Recovery Time

For a skinny dude, this step is the most important of the 3.

It makes the most of the recovery window (after a workout) and allows you to get in a handy amount of calories.

It's part of the the reason Mike was able to get results like this:
That’s no mistake! This really works that well.

Most people simply consume a whey protein shake, or, worse yet, chocolate milk post workout.

This isn’t enough.

If you’re a skinny guy, then not only do you want nutrients to fuel recovery, but you also want enough macros in your post-workout window, in order to cause an overall bump in macros and calories for the entire day. (Remember, we’re focusing on an overall day, as a skinny guy, rather than just one snippet of time/meal.)

If you want to learn the entire method and the rest of the process, then click here We're currently rewriting this article.

The simple version is this...
This is an oldie, but goodie!
Put this to work, with the rest of what I’ve given you, and a solid workout program and I guarantee you’ll be building muscle in no time.

It works that damn well!
05 CHAPTER

Your next steps when going from skinny to superhero

You’ve learned some of the key tools, hacks, and strategies you need to completely crush your nutrition as a skinny guy.
You’ve learned some of the key tools, hacks, and strategies you need to completely crush your nutrition as a skinny guy.

In Part 1, we looked at why getting your nutrition is right, and why
most have it completely wrong.

In Part 2, I showed you the biggest mistakes and myths most skinny guys fall for, and why most goo-roos have it all wrong

In Part 3, we walked through the 3 macros you need in your meal plans in order to build muscle (miss just one and you’ll fail to build muscle as quickly as you could)

In Part 4, we talked about the science behind how often you need to eat, how to fit meal planning in your life, and the 2 frameworks you can plug into your life to get the best results

In Part 5, you learned how to eat before, during and after your
workout to recover faster, lift stronger and make the most out of
your workout program

I hope this guide shows you how you can make the most out of your nutrition and why it doesn't have to be as difficult as you might have believed.

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